Conflicts & War

Egypt tells Israel it will suspend peace treaty if it violates military protocols

Cairo, Feb 12 (EFE).- Egypt has informed Israel that it will suspend the Camp David Accords, which in 1979 ended the long conflicts between the two countries, if the Jewish state presses the Palestinians to cross into the Arab country in its military offensive, an Egyptian security official told EFE Monday.

“Egypt informed Israel of the suspension of the Camp David Accords if Israel violates the military and security protocols of this treaty, which paved the way for peace between the two countries,” said the official, who asked not to be named due to the sensitivity of the issue.

The official said the Egyptian threat to suspend the peace treaty, which has been the cornerstone of stability in the region for nearly half a century, came after Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced that he had ordered an attack on the town of Rafah, at the southern end of the Palestinian enclave, bordering Egypt.

“Any attempt to pressure the Palestinians to cross into Egypt would be met with the suspension of the peace agreement signed between the two countries,” the official stressed.

According to the Saudi channel Al Arabiya, Cairo has already decided to limit communications with Israel at the security level only to continue negotiations on the truce and detainee exchange agreement, while freezing any governmental communication with the Israeli side.

On Sunday, the Egyptian foreign ministry called for the need to unite all international and regional efforts to prevent an attack on the Palestinian city of Rafah, which now houses approximately 1.4 million Palestinians, which is expected to have severe consequences.

Egypt, the first Arab country to sign peace with Israel in 1979 and a key mediator in negotiations for a truce in Gaza, has reiterated in recent months its rejection of a possible forced displacement of Gazans in the face of the Israeli bombing and ground operation in the enclave. EFE

haro-ar-ijm/sc

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