Politics

Malaysia imposes docking ban on Israeli ships in response to Gaza ‘massacre’

Kuala Lumpur, Dec 20 (EFE).- Malaysia said on Wednesday that it would not allow ships with Israeli flags to dock at its ports, including merchant vessels of the Israeli multinational ZIM, in response to Israel’s military offensive in the Gaza Strip.

Prime Minister Anwar Ibrahim, who holds the finance portfolio, said his government was indefinitely banning ZIM ships that until now docked at Malaysian ports despite no diplomatic ties between Malaysia and Israel.

“The Malaysian government has decided to restrict and disallow the Israeli shipping company ZIM from docking at any Malaysian port,” Anwar said.

“Malaysia will also prohibit any ships on the way to Israel from unloading cargo in Malaysian ports. Both of these bans come into effect immediately,” he said.

The prime minister said the ban was “in response to Israel’s violation of basic humanitarian principles and international law over the ongoing continued massacre and brutality against the Palestinian people.”

According to Anwar, the Malaysian government granted ZIM ships permission to dock in Malaysian ports in 2005.

“However, the government has decided to override the past cabinet’s decision,” he said in a press statement.

He said vessels en route to Israel will also not be allowed to dock at Malaysian ports.

“Malaysia is confident this decision will not affect the ongoing trade activities,” he said.

The war in the Hamas-governed Gaza Strip began after militants from the Islamist group launched an attack on Oct. 7 against Israel, massacring 1,200 people and kidnapping 250.

The Israeli Army responded with an offensive against Gaza, killing 19,000 Palestinians, mostly women and children, and injuring 51,000.

The military has forced 1.9 million people, 85 percent of the Gaza population, out of their homes.

Malaysia, a Muslim-majority country, does not have diplomatic relations with Israel and is a staunch supporter of the Palestinian cause. EFE

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