Health

Mexico celebrates marijuana day with demands for future law

Mexico City, Apr 20 (EFE).- Mexico City celebrated marijuana day Tuesday with mass gatherings, asking that the regularization law being drafted in the country meet consumer needs.

“Today is important because to start with, it is a special day, but there is nothing to celebrate, we are in mourning, sad and angry. It is legislation that is badly made and also was going to be approved but they stopped and asked for an extension,” Francisco Lopez, spokesman for Plantón 420, from the Mexican Senate, told EFE.

The Supreme Court ordered in 2019 to regulate the recreational use of marijuana in Mexico, as it considers its prohibition unconstitutional, but the initiative is stalled in the country’s senate.

A first version of the text was approved by the senate on Nov. 19 last year, but on Mar. 10 it was modified by the lower house and it returned to the upper chamber.

Senators do not agree on several modifications made by parliamentarians, so they asked the supreme court for a new extension of the deadline to approve the law, which expires on Apr. 30.

For many consumers, this extension is unnecessary and it is urgent to move forward so that recreational marijuana use is finally legal in the country, which would be the third in the world to have this type of law, after Uruguay and Canada.

However, a part of consumers, although they share the urgency, consider it is necessary to make a law based on their needs, not those of “the markets.”

“The Supreme Court ordered to modify five articles of the constitution but (in the proposal) they did not do it, they regulated licenses, they regulated a market and it is not what the Supreme Court dictated,” Lopez added.

The project allows carrying up to a maximum of 28 grams of cannabis and provides for a licensing system to grow up to eight plants at home, found smokers associations, as well as produce and sell marijuana and industrial hemp.

Cannabis activists believe the future law criminalizes consumers, as it provides fines and jail time for possessing more than 28 grams.

At the cannabis sit-in next to the senate, more than 1,000 people crowded in front of a small stage where there was music for much of the afternoon and which peaked at 4:20 p.m. (9:20 p.m. GMT), as both the time and date read 420 — commonly associated with marijuana consumption.

Among them Yamileth, who considered the advances important although he understands that “the laws normally in Mexico benefit the highest powers, not the consumer or the problem.”

Even so, he considered this type of demonstration important to “begin to open” the minds of many people and understand that cannabis is something “completely natural.”

“Tobacco, alcohol or some drugs do more harm to your body and are legal,” he sentenced.

Like her, Rodrigo Sosa considered the advances “very transcendent” and said something like this had never been seen, referring to the sit-in in front of the Senate, in which they legally managed to have a (public) space to smoke and grow – not to sell – marijuana.

“As long as we do not affect other people, such as adults or children and we can use this public space, it is good for us,” the young man said. EFE

ia/lds

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